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Monthly Archives: January 2011

Col. Ochola Walter, you are a disgrace to the civilised races and the people you represent

By Stephen Twinoburyo

Can you believe Col. Ochola Walter used the following statements last night against two women he disagreed with in a debate on on facebook? This man, according to his profile is employed by the president’s office. He is the Resident District Commissioner (RDC) for Gulu and is a representative of the NRM in Acholi. He is now contesting for Gulu District LC 5 Chairman position on the NRM ticket. That this man is the one who on Radion Uganda in 1985 announced General Tito Okello Lutwa’s takeover of government after the overthrow of Milton Obote says a lot about that government. Some opposition parties in northern Uganda have accused him of arming thugs to terrorise them – the kind of language and mental intent displayed below makes one wonder whether this is not true. I have been dismayed that this man holds high positions in this government, my dismay based on the various remarks he has made on facebook over time and the language he has been using.

 

From the Col Ochola Walter:

 
 
 
 
 

Gulu RDC and LC 5 Chairman candidate

 

 

 

Col Ochora Walter: XXXX look for a husband and give him that advise. you know you will never represent the Acholis.

Col Ochora Walter: YYYY we dont have male prostitudes in my community unless you want to share with me how much you charge for a round of KASHABALI.

 

 

 

Responses:

Stephen Twinoburyo: Sincerely speaking I think Nathan you should help us and remove this piece of filthy misfit from this debate otherwise the rest of us can’t share a stage with such rottenness.

Ochola, if you don’t apologise to the two ladies or Nathan does not block you, some of us cannot share a stage with you. I don’t remember when I last heard such language and I cannot imagine any environment, leave alone facebook, when I would meet it. I don’t want those kinds of words in my inbox.

Those who come from Acholi, please tell the people of Acholi the kind of person Col Ochola is. I can’t believe that this man can lead or represent even two people and worse still that the NRM would have him on their ticket. What crime would… the people of Acholi have committed to deserve such a man if he were to be thrust upon them? The words coming out of his mouth tell a lot about the kind of person he is. No wonder the previous regimes he represented failed. If this man represents any position in any government, then that government deserves to be disliked. What a pity that there are people who look up to him. I wonder what his family go through if he has got any. If there was a misconception that rotten minds no longer exist in this world, this is a rude wake up

David Wlliam Rukanshonga: @Steve. Imagine someone like him representing you in parliament and taking a decision on your behalf. What a shame. Does this filth have kids who call him dad, coz honestly I feel sorry for them.

 

Ruhweza Patrick: Nathan, I request you delete Ochola from this debate or you delete me. Am sorry but i can’t stand it any more…… I am very comfortable to leave than stand his vulgar language! XXXX, I request you not to respond to Ochola’s posts.

Jennifer Oola: I have been reading through this post and am speechless, I cant find words to use. God help the Ugandan!!!!!

Drew Ddembe: This is one thread I have not been following closely. Quite frankly the involvement of Col Ochora on this forum made it unattractive!

I find it useful to discuss issues with intelligent people however misguided they maybe. Intelligent people… review their positions and listen to new facts and arguments. A discussion with intelligent people is a dynamic event!

From what Col Ochora has written here so far one sees a man if one can call him that who is not worth one’s time engaging in any form of debate! He has so far said nothing except to yell slogans and offensive vulgarisms!

That the people in the NRM consider this man to be one of them instead of shunning someone who is obviously no better than a jumped up street thug who has got to where he is by wielding a gun without a brain behind it is reason for concern.

There were three types of followers in the book “Animal Farm”. The sheep and the faithful “simple” and hard working horses and the dogs -nasty pieces of work with small brains whose roles was to attack anyone who questioned the way the animals revolution was being run by the pigs! Col Ochora is a dog! He is no better than a pimped up dog in a suit. I normally reserve the term “paesants in suits” for our leaders but calling Col Ochora a paesant in a suit is an insult to paesants in Uganda! This piece of garbage cannot possibly be one of them -people who for the most part are respectful and do not use the kind of gutter language he choses to use! This idiot reminds me of Obote’s soldiers and the way they behaved and is a reminder we still have such idiots among us! Most of our paesants would be appalled at the use of such language!

My grandmother always told me that it was very important who you associated with! that you could tell ones character by the type of people he or she associated with! Museveni choses to associate with Col Ochora. He should be judged for that! We have got to assume that they have got something in common else they wouldn’t be together!

We too have to make the same choice -to associate with or to shun this man who choses to disrespect women on this forum whose only crime is to disagree with him!

The way we treat our women, says a lot about who we are as a society! I would like to believe that the way that Col. Ochora addresses women is not how “gallant” Acholi men treat their women or the way that we as Ugandan men treat our women.

I would therefore like to add my voice to all those who have called on Nathan to block Col Ochora from this forum to please do the needful! We should chose who we can and cannot associate with and i for one do not see the need to share space even on FB with this idiot! I also request everyone to flag Col Ochora’s comments and report them to FB as offensive!

I would like to add that having read both Ms Lalobo’s and Ms Ssuuna’s contributions to this forum, I have gained immense respect for their intellect abd debating skills and wonder why we leave idiots like Ochora to “lead’ our nation!

To Ms Lalobo, I think you would do the people of Gulu a great favour if you were to chose to join politics and remove this piece of garbage from our politics! This is one thread I have not been following closely. Quite frankly the involvement of Col Ochora on this forum made it unattractive!

I find it useful to discuss issues with intelligent people however misguided they maybe. Intelligent people… review their positions and listen to new facts and arguments. A discussion with intelligent people is a dynamic event!

From what Col Ochora has written here so far one sees a man if one can call him that who is not worth one’s time engaging in any form of debate! He has so far said nothing except to yell slogans and offensive vulgarisms!

That the people in the NRM consider this man to be one of them instead of shunning someone who is obviously no better than a jumped up street thug who has got to where he is by wielding a gun without a brain behind it is reason for concern.

There were three types of followers in the book “Animal Farm”. The sheep and the faithful “simple” and hard working horses and the dogs -nasty pieces of work with small brains whose roles was to attack anyone who questioned the way the animals revolution was being run by the pigs! Col Ochora is a dog! He is no better than a pimped up dog in a suit. I normally reserve the term “paesants in suits” for our leaders but calling Col Ochora a peasant in a suit is an insult to peasants in Uganda! This piece of garbage cannot possibly be one of them -people who for the most part are respectful and do not use the kind of gutter language he choses to use! This idiot reminds me of Obote’s soldiers and the way they behaved and is a reminder we still have such idiots among us! Most of our peasants would be appalled at the use of such language!

My grandmother always told me that it was very important who you associated with! that you could tell ones character by the type of people he or she associated with! Museveni chooses to associate with Col Ochora. He should be judged for that! We have got to assume that they have got something in common else they wouldn’t be together!

We too have to make the same choice -to associate with or to shun this man who choses to disrespect women on this forum whose only crime is to disagree with him!

The way we treat our women, says a lot about who we are as a society! I would like to believe that the way that Col. Ochora addresses women is not how “gallant” Acholi men treat their women or the way that we as Ugandan men treat our women.

I would therefore like to add my voice to all those who have called on Nathan to block Col Ochora from this forum to please do the needful! We should chose who we can and cannot associate with and i for one do not see the need to share space even on FB with this idiot! I also request everyone to flag Col Ochora’s comments and report them to FB as offensive!

I would like to add that having read both Ms Lalobo’s and Ms Ssuuna’s contributions to this forum, I have gained immense respect for their intellect abd debating skills and wonder why we leave idiots like Ochora to “lead’ our nation!

To Ms Lalobo, I think you would do the people of Gulu a great favour if you were to chose to join politics and remove this piece of garbage from our politics!

Godfrey Kahangi: Ochola. You are a dirty old man. This forum has witnessed many forms of debate and attracted a wide array of discussants, with a myriad of political views, but this is the first time we’ve ever encountered such raw vulgarism as a format of discourse.

You’re a disgrace! Your derogatory remarks to our esteemed and revered discussants, XXXX and YYYY, reveal not only a dirty mind but also a propensity to violence towards ladies. We acknowledge that your comments are not representative of either the Acholi men or males generally. They are a product of your private warped mindset.

Like all before me, I add my voice in condemnation and demand, NOT an apology, as it would not be sincere, but demand that this forum is rid of your filth by blocking you and removing your sorry existence from this discussion. Once again, you are a disgrace!

 

Muhiire Nathan: Col. Walter Ochora, you have really tested my patience. PleaseI I beg you to make an apology in the interest of Acholi community, NRM your family and God. I cannot believe this oh my God! I had not seen other comments! What careless remarks from a candidate who is compaigning to lead a traumatised district?

YYYY: Nathan since I am currently not seeking for any elected office in Acholi or elsewhere for that matter the ‘cynical talk’ from the Colonel serves no purpose.

Just so that I can make myself clear, there is absolutely nothing vulgar or …wrong with looking for a spouse. Most living creatures do that and it is normal and highly encouraged as relationships form the basis of families and hence the entire society. There is no culture in Uganda that practices polyandry. Maybe Ochora wants me to become either a Maasai from Kenya or Tanzania or better still from Asia -Bhutan, Nepal, Sri Lanka or Mongolia where some communities practice polyandry. That I am afraid is not an achievable desire.

Maria Bisaso: Col Walter Ochola how can you write such rubbish? i’m a mother of five grown up women who are on facebook and following these forums. Are you a parent? why should NRM field such uncivilised characters of your behaviours?. Ee can disagree politically but it doesn’t require one to use such language in an international discussion. you are the biggest embarrassment. Nathan, delete Ochora’s comments they are not fit to be on anyone’s wall. i will not miss to contribute where such rubbish has been posted. how will my children, relatives & associates view my association with such characters.

David William Rukanshonga: Maria. I’m a man but was so embarrassed to read the trash he wrote. Glad to see NRM has some sensible women like you.

Stephen Twinoburyo: Maria, thanks. Much as we may disagree, there is a level of respect that must be maintained. For instance Maria we have disagreed a number of times but I still respect you and would sit and have a cup of coffee with you. But how can a per…son sit with a man like Ochola? He is a disgrace to all the people he represents.

Those who come from Acholi, please let the people know what kind of man Col Ochola is. He is not fit to represent any human being. He deserves to be sent to obscurity and never appear on any public forum that represents Uganda or her people.

Drew Ddembe: In any other country, Col Ochora would have been asked to resign immediately!In the early years of the NRM, Otafiire, probably the most crude member of the NRM high command crude as in lacking polish not gutter crude like Ochora, drew a pistol after being insulted by the wife of Kuteesa another NRM minister.

Otafiire was required to resign and did so immediately! Everyone expected that thats the way things should be!

In later years Otafiire was reinstated which is not necessarily a problem. The problem is that even after he ended up in court for refusing to pay child support, he still stayed put as an NRM politician!

Could this be a sign of the changes in character and the values of the NRM? Opondo got caught up in the “underweargate scandal” soon after shooting and killing a man and didn’t get so much as an inquest. Mukula and Muhwezi remain big men within the NRM. An NRM politician was convicted of using the diplomatic bag to carry drugs to Europe while another convicted and jailed in Europe for his role in the CHOGM money scandals remained an employee of the government! Fox Odoi bought and sold land strategically placed along the route of the northern bypass and claimed ‘compensation’ for what could have only been the result of insider knowledge then later shot a man during elections! Nasser Ssebagala was “rewarded” for a job well done in presiding over the most corrupt and incompetent Kampala City Council government with a state house and a position “behind” President Museveni’s behind while Col Ochora, he with the foul mouth remains the NRM’s strong man and power broker in the north specifically Gulu!!

Of course we know that Col Ochora is not going to resign and the NRM will continue having him on their cards as their man in the north!

Nathan, in my opinion, you should block Ochora.

The only useful purpose he serves at present is to embarrass the NRM, otherwise he is no use to the debate.

Quite frankly the message needs to go out that we shouldn’t be tolerating that kind of …politician who is no more than a street thug!

In any other society, that kind of comment to women by a politician calls for immediate resignation and his handlers have got to be seen to distance themselves from him else suffer the wrath of women and all right thinking people at the polls!

Only in a country where women are disrespected can he be allowed to get away with his comments!

Joanita Annete Kategaya: Col Ochola, shame on you; how dare you stoop this low??you are the “rotten tomatoes” in the NRM party..this is despicable and really pity your children and wife!!!political maturity and tolerance are attributes not synonymous with you.. Nathan kindly bloke the Ochola’s of this world.The only useful purpose he has is to bring shame and degradation to the NRM party… We should spread the word on this.. I am really embarrassed and saddened!!!

Nathan, it is not enough for Col. Ochola to apologise.. I believe there is too much water that has gone under the bridge!!! Time always tells the story and indeed Ocola’s true colors are out. Enough is enough.. You know the likes of Ochola think that by being abusive and derogatory, those are signs that they are “NRM Diehards”. This is simply being more Catholic than the Pope.. Also crying more than the bereaved…Nathan, delete/block this loose cannon from our midst. We have been having mature discussions and disagreeing amicably and in a decent manner!!!

Mercy Akongo: I suggest we come up with a petition asking the president to order Col.Ochora to step down. Nathan save a copy of his posts before deleting the comments. We have to get the media involved all around East Africa. Nathan please save a copy of this and let’s draft a petition and send it across networks for people to read and sign. We can start by presenting a copy to the president and request him to act or else, we must involve the public (Ugandans)

 

These are previous statements, among many others, made by Col Ochola:

Col Ochora Walter There is no war in the North.I know you wish it never ended because of your distance from the North. Your human waste will be given a decent burrial when the moment of truth arrives.  January 21 at 9:57pm

Col Ochora Walter Read the Local Government Act and know the responsibility of various stakeholders instead of fucking around ignorantly. January 23 at 9:48am

Col Ochora Walter The facebook rats who waste their time on me should know that i am allergic to fools and the people who know me so well bare me witness. The Acholis know my values and the way i treat serious people not just internet fanatics. January 24 at 11:03am

You can find more of this on:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=177067848983011&set=a.100120663344397.48.100000393901179#!/photo.php?fbid=177067848983011&set=a.100120663344397.48.100000393901179&notif_t=photo_reply

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Posted by on January 25, 2011 in Stephen Twinoburyo's blogs

 

What foreign students can learn about studying in S Africa

By Stephen Twinoburyo

South Africa has become a destination of choice for many African students wishing to pursue tertiary education. The universities in the country also attract students from as far as Europe and North America. For African students, South Africa has particular advantages in that the students are able to attain world-class education, usually at a cheaper cost than they would ordinarily have got overseas, and still have a sense of African belonging.

South Africa has 17 public universities, the top 8 in descending order being: University of Cape Town, University of Pretoria, Stellenbosch University (Cape Town), University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), University of KwaZulu-Natal (Durban), Rhodes University  (Grahamstown – Eastern Cape), University of South Africa (Pretoria – distance education) and University of the Western Cape (Cape Town). As can be seen, the top positions are dominated by universities in Gauteng and Western Cape provinces. These universities almost maintain the same positions in Africa.

Having studied at Makerere University and then two universities in South Africa, I have found that South African universities are far well facilitated and offer practical programmes. Most students are able to relate what they study to the environment around them. Besides, a lot of money is pumped into academic research. A lot of research that has been carried out by the universities has gone on to be used by the government and private sector outside the academic environment. Government departments (ministries) like Trade and Industry, Science and Technology, Minerals and Energy, National Treasury as well as other bodies like Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and National Research Foundation (NRF), work closely with the universities to tap into their resources. A lot of South Africa’s military technology has been developed in the CSIR laboratories. Financial institutions like banks too, collaborate with relevant university departments and tap into academic brains to aid their research and developments. This makes the academic programmes be tailored to the existing requirements in the practical world. South African academics and students have been able to produce some of the innovations and developments that have made the country prosper. The academics are not much separated from the world around and much that is applied in the real world, have academic grounding and precison.

These are all advantages Africa can tap into. Many African students have attended these universities, excelled and gone on to be employed in crucial sectors in the country. There are many Ugandans employed in top positions in vital areas of the country – both in government and private sectors. Some universities offer free PHD programmes. Prospective students can search the websites of these universities for information that may be of help to them. Most enquiries and applications can be done online.

Besides universities, there are 6 institutions known as Universities of Technology. These were formerly technical institutions (known then as technokons) but a few years ago, they were upgraded and turned into universities of technology. They are now able to offer undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. They are still though, undermined by their previous name tag and the fact that they catered mainly for black student. Previously, black students were not permitted to attend some of the top universities mentioned above. The top 3 universities still have an overwhelmingly white staff. Stellenbosch is still predominantly white both in staff and students.

What then are the advantages and challenges to foreign students of studying in South Africa? I spoke to two Ugandans in the academic field at two universities and they gave me the following tips and advice.

Professor Annet Oguttu, the first female professor at the University of South Africa’s college of law and first black woman to obtain a PHD in tax law at a South African university offers the advice that “studying in a foreign country is not easy and it is quite expensive. But furthering one’s studies is one of the best investments one can make for themselves. . If you have to make such a costly investment, then do it wisely. As much as is within your ability, invest yourself in the most marketable, rare and high demand courses out there.  The world has become a global village so go for courses that meet the demands of a globalised or international market. Seek career advice before you commence your studies. ” She also advises against mediocre mentality and says there are a lot of opportunities out there. “Time has come for this generation of African students to stop this ‘victim’ mentality that blames all our failures and inadequacies on our past history. Do not allow yourself to be a prisoner of your past”, she says.

Ms Olive Ayo Biraba, a PHD student in Education Technology at the University of Cape Town says the university has first-class facilities for study especially at undergraduate level, has a number of bookshops both in and around campus, has good physical and online library facilities, is well-located with minimum interruptions from the public, has good facilities for students with disabilities and has plenty of computer labs distributed all over campus and student residences. She however advises that Cape Town is a very expensive city, accommodation and transport can be a challenge if one lives outside students’ residences, there is a lot of home-sickness, junk-food may be the way to go, one may have to deal with segregation, and getting employment is not straight-forward. Foreign students are advised to have enough financial backing before heading for Cape Town and once in Cape Town, try campus accommodation first unless they have somebody outside to help, not team up with the wrong company, have support groups e.g church and other country mates and be security conscious at all times.

Of course foreign students need to adjust to the advanced life in South Africa and not forget the core purpose of being here. Some get taken up by the “marvels of life” in this country to the detriment of their studies. Life is pretty tough here when one runs out money and careful expenditure and budgeting are needed. It’s a pure capitalist world where everything depends on money and people to rescue somebody are few. Prospective students need to be advised that South Africa hardly has piece-jobs (kyeyo) like many of the overseas countries.

It’s always important to seek advice before students embark on a journey down south. Good advice can be obtained from the South African High Commission in Kampala, the Ugandan embassy in South Africa, the association of Ugandan Professionals in SA (www.aupsa.org.za) as well as the universities themselves. Students should at all costs avoid institutions that little is known about.

With the right attitude and determination, all possibilities are open. A lot that is learnt here can be used to develop many of our African countries if there is the right management.

 
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Posted by on January 24, 2011 in Stephen Twinoburyo's blogs

 

The highs and lows of Museveni’s visit to South Africa

By Stephen Twinoburyo

Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni, visited South Africa this week from Thursday 20th January to Saturday 22nd January.

From the official perspective, both on his side and that of his hosts, the visit went well. He signed important bilateral treaties with Zuma in Pretoria on Friday and attended a Zulu war commemoration in Kwazulu Natal on Saturday. The treaties included areas of trade, mining and Agriculture. It’s the press conference after the official meeting with Zuma that was quite interesting. Journalists asked him if he has not learnt lessons from Tunisia considering his long stay in power. He replied that Tunisia has a different set of circumstances and added that he has done a good job in leading his country. “We have been in power for a long time yes, but we were also in the struggle for a long time,” said Museveni. “In fact I don’t see myself as being in power, I see myself being in the struggle.” This is a remark I heard being laughed at on one of the top radios. The visit has gone largely unreported by the Sunday papers though it got mention in some newscasts during the week, mainly because of President Zuma’s pronunciation on Ivory Coast and the Zulu commemoration.

Things within the Ugandan camp, however, were not going so well throughout his visit. His visit has been largely kept secret by the Ugandan High Commission in Pretoria though this information is freely available to the South African media and his itinerary could easily be found by a google search. Most Ugandans were completely unbothered by the attempts by the Ugandan authorities to shroud the visit in secrecy and not invite any Ugandans to meet him so they just went about with their normal activities.

 As has been witnessed over the recent past, most power fights seen in Uganda are fiercer within the NRM than between the NRM and outside political forces. The Ugandan ambassador to SA, Mr. Kweronda Ruhemba, a bush war veteran and former minister in Museveni’s cabinet took one matter so lightly. He rejected pleas from the NRM organisation in South Africa to be included on the programme to see their president. I think he holds this group in contempt and doesn’t seem to respect its leadership. Through their contacts in Kampala, the group’s convenor and General Secretary, Mr David Rwamutemba, learnt of the president’s programme and organised his members to surprise the entourage. Dressed in NRM yellow t-shirts they out of nowhere appeared at Sheraton Hotel in Pretoria, where Museveni was scheduled to stay, shortly before he arrived. Mr Rwamutemba then met Ministers Sam Kutesa, Kahinda Otafiire, John Nasasira, Hope Mwesigye and Saida Bumba and informed them that there was a group of Ugandans that had gathered outside and wanted to meet Museveni. This took Mr Kuteesa by surprise as these people didn’t appear on the programme he was given and expressed surprise that the embassy had rejected requests to include South African based Ugandans on the programme.

Mr Kweronda appeared a few minutes later and his boss, Mr Kutesa (Foreign Affairs minister), asked him to go and meet the Ugandans outside. When he got outside, he instead asked them what had brought them to Sheraton Hotel and told them to quickly get into their cars and leave. This incensed the group who insulted and manhandled him telling him that he had no authority to tell them where they needed to be. He summoned security but Mr Kuteesa quickly stepped in and calmed the situation, and more importantly to avoid negative publicity. The group was invited into the hotel and toasted to eats and drinks on the house by Finance Minister, Saida Bumba. She went on to explain to them the government programmes that her department is facilitating, and most importantly to the diaspora, a Uganda Shillings 60 billion youth fund that will be accessible to young skilled Ugandans in the diaspora if they have ideas that can add value to the country. Later, Mr Kuteesa promised the group that they would meet the president the following day at 4 pm.

The following day, they regrouped at Sheraton Hotel and when it became probable that they would not see the president due to his schedule, they camped outside the lift he was going to use. When he got out, he was surprised to see them, greeted them, apologised for not having time to speak to them and left for Durban. That marked the end of Museveni’s visit to South Africa as far as Ugandans were concerned. The NRM group is still reportedly planning pickets outside the embassy calling for the ambassador to be replaced. His position seems to be very shaky judging from reports reaching Twino Speaks about private comments that came from some of the ministers and NRM top wigs. He is suspected by NRM royalists to be sabotaging the party and more especially, the president.

Friday also included a business workshop at Sheraton Hotel between Ugandan business people and their South African counterparts. This visit went largely unnoticed by Ugandans here, it was poorly scheduled such that Museveni failed to address it as planned and the business delegation that came from Uganda did not interact with any Ugandan business person based in South Africa.

Meanwhile the Forum for Democratic Change (FDC)’s supporters in South Africa had also been planning a demonstration to coincide with his arrival but seemingly his arrival time jeopardised their plans.

Wife of the president, Mrs Janet Museveni, toured a high-tech farm from which some skills and technology are expected to be transferred to the Karamoja region.

Many Ugandans in South Africa have expressed disappointment at the way their government is treating them. Museveni last met them almost 10 years ago though he has been here a couple of times since. As far as the visit is concerned, the embassy and its parent body, Foreign Affairs ministry, shoulder most of the blame for these kinds of shambles regarding the Ugandan community in South Africa. The ministers present feigned surprise at learning of Ugandans in South Africa yet they’ve been jetting in and out of this country. Though the president’s programme is arranged, he very well knows there are many of his country people in the country he is visiting and should have told his juniours that he wants to meet them.

It is rumoured that Ugandans in South Africa are suffering the sins of Museveni’s main political challenger, Dr Kiiza Besigye, having lived in South Africa while in exile. This time Museveni reportedly promised to come back and meet Ugandans in April. Considering that presidential elections are taking place in February, it is yet to be established whether he will visit as president or common Ugandan. If he comes as a common Ugandan, many of us will surely have a chance to speak to him.

 
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Posted by on January 23, 2011 in Stephen Twinoburyo's blogs

 

Facebook plea for Museveni to be given another chance, and good send-off

Maria Bisaso: Let us not yearn for instability Ugandans should not forget very fast

Corruption in this country was made worse after the topple of Obote and the expulsion of Asians. Many incompetent Ugandans were assigned duti…es which they couldn’t execute perfectly. People took over businesses which they never built.

Amin killed people openly, some were forced to eat sandals on our streets how many people who were taken to Nile mansions and came out alive. Amin never tolerated constructive criticism. A whole archbishop of church of Uganda with two cabinet ministers were murdered. Other religious leaders like Festo Kivengeli had to escape Amin targeted Acholis and Langi’s in Police army & prisons. Thousands of them were killed in cold blood simply because of their tribes. President Museveni opposed Amin. It is Museveni who picked up courage to start a guerrilla war against Amin right away from 1972. The excesses o of the army including extra judicial killings were occurring on a daily basis.

Amin lost control over his government. Everyone who had a big political office including regional governors could decide your fate. Smuggling, extortion and grabbing of wives, daughters, cars and houses became a daily occurrence. His regime terrified everyone.

Obote also lost control over his government. No Ugandan could dare ask Oyite ojok about the sales of our national coffee including president obote himself. At one time Col. Omaria intercepted Oyites trucks of coffee being smuggled out the country the orders came from Obote. Instead its Oyite who arrested Omaria tortured him, took him to his house opened tapes of water on him throughout the night the next day Omaria went to report to Obote in a dripping mood, Obote just warned him to be careful of Oyite.

I don’t need to mention many individuals in Obote’s government who were above the law and also above Obote’s control including Tito Okello Basilio Okello, Rwakasisi, Paul Muwanga, Rurangaranga,Mateke the list is endless. Someone from the opposition would never win a case against a UPC cadre.

President Museveni has managed to control the government for 25 years although with alot of loopholes. Museven is not an angel. I also have some issues with him more especially with the rampant corruption in government institutions. Its us Ugandans who are making Museveni’s work very difficult in his crusade to fight corruption. Museveni does no elect leaders. My biggest worry is that most of the suspected corrupt people are going to be elected back to their offices by the electorate. We need to do civic education, tell the masses not to elect corrupt leaders. Even if Besigye wins these elections, he will have no choice apart from working with people’s representatives. Museveni has had many challenges but at least he has managed to create the rule of law and stability. On corruption his assistants have failed him. It is very important that we give Museveni a befitting send-off. I don’t see Museveni contesting after 2016. A peaceful transition is very necessary.

We shouldn’t forget very fast. Managing a transition is not very easy. Where are we coming from? Where are we now? Where are we heading? Have we learnt any lesson? Removing a snake from your house does not require you pulling down the entire structure.

Responses:

Drew Ddembe: Maria, with all due respect, I am starting to believe that you are overpaid!

Many thanks for the history lesson! The problem you (and Museveni) have is that the majority of us do not care!

Museveni was one of those people who messed up this country all fighting so that they could be life presidents. If they were all not too busy fighting for power, we would not be where we are now!

Obote had to be booted out -twice!

Idi Amin had to be booted out too!

Now Museveni wishes to be booted out too because he does not know when to step aside and hand over the baton!!!

Museveni was a mercenary. He was brought in to do a job by Ugandans who were tired of his predecessors. Do not forget that he did not really have any mandate to fight and kill on behalf of Ugandans. He lost an election in his own constituency and his political party had only one seat in parliament!

His treasonous acts and treachery were legitimised by Ugandans. In 1986, he demanded and was granted one term. He completed it. In 1991, he was granted another term -to help draw up a constitution. In 1996, he again sought another term and got it.

His job was to rehabilitate this country, help build strong and independent institutions and, recruit and train a professional army and oversee the reconstruction and rehabilitation of our infrastructure. He was meant to make all of us Ugandans proud of our country once again! He has failed in that job!

Today, we are as divided as ever. Uganda only exists in the minds of those who wish to seal from the rest of us -the rest of us have been reduced to thinking locally! We eat rats so that the president who has usurped all powers in this country, can “grant’ us a district so that we too can have a budget funded by central government so some of our own home boys can steal too from the national cake. instead of peace, we have continued to fight wars in one or other corner of this country for over 20 years. We are now setting ourselves up to be the regional policemen! I don’t remember Museveni being granted the right to involve us in all sorts of wars at his whim! Do Ugandans really wish to be the regional policemen when they have a myriad of issues at home? Or does Museveni think that keeping his dogs of war occupied overseas will prevent them from causing trouble at home? Sooner or later they will come home!

In 2001, he was told he needed to think about moving on to look after his cows and goats in Rwakitura. He said he still had some work to do -the army was not professional. A professional army is one that stays out of politics and reports for duty to defend our country regardless of who is the head of state as long as that head of state has the popular mandate of the voters. Training and promotions are on merit and the army is devoid of regionalism! Various Generals have made it clear that they lack professionalism and would not serve under anyone else and may even interfrere if the “wrong” people won an election! So Museveni failed in that lubimbi and can be awarded a zero! Museveni promised that the 5 year term from 2001 was going to be his last! During that campaign he promised UPE off the cuff without funds or budgeting in place. You yourself cannot take a child of yours to a UPE school!

In 2006, he begged for another term because some misguided people like yourself, “begged him” to stay! He was going to implement USE. He was also going to fight corruption that had dogged his regime since 1986!

Here we are still talking about corruption! There is no plan for corruption; the police is the mafia boss. The high court registry is a market place and corruption rules the corridors of power in this country! After 24 years in power, his cabal of thieves have stolen to their hearts content but wait -there is still oil to steal! they cannot go home and let Besigye steal the oil because that’s the only reason he wishes to be president!

I hate to put it to you bluntly but this is not Museveni’s property. If he has failed in the job he was mandated, he needs to hand over and move on. If he fails to do that, you and i know that sooner or later, he will be forced to move on. So as someone who loves him, you should be telling him that it is time for him to retire before some young idiot embarrasses him, just like he embarrassed Obote two and a half decades ago! or in the way Ben Ali, “father of the nation” in Tunisia has just been embarrassed!

Christine Lubwa Oryema Lalobo: Maria, I sincerely believe your innermost good wishes for a peaceful and smooth transition of power but like many before you I am afraid that Museveni will not give you that comfort. When he came into power in 1986 he said his was a transition government and Ugandans jubilated that finally some sensible person is at the reign of power. He then put in place a number of Commission of Inquiries and all of them worked extremely hard because hope had ben rekindled. The Oder Commission is one that we can single out because it was the findings from the Oder Commission that was used to set up the Odoki Constitutional Commission. In the meantime Museveni was saying he needs time to complete the Constitutional process that he had commenced upon. Most Ugandans seems to be in agreement. Come 1995 the Constitution was promulgated and Museveni said I will run for the Office of the Presidency just this once under the new Constitution. Ugandans agreed. He did so and won. Then he said I need to professionalize the army and run for the final term allowed under the constitution. Ugandans agreed…Then the Sempebwa Commission was set up to review the Constitution and his findings were thrown off the rubbish pit. Before we know it MPs were being given bribes to change the constitution. Incidentally it is the glut to change the constitution that is what sparked off the formation of new districts and you will note that the ‘suspect’ districts remained intact till very late. That route for the change was however abandoned when it became evident that it would be very complicated to get two thirds of the districts to endorse the change.

Maria does it not appear strange to you that the only article that the Mps changed was the term limit?

Anyway with the term limit off Museveni now had a free ride. He brought in Prosperity for All and now you know what he is saying.

Maria I do not want to dampen your hope but the history of your Hero speaks volumes.

This morning when I saw the cleaners of City Council toiling in the wee hours of the morning and realized that their money with NSSF has been turned into a toy by men who wear designer clothes and whose households use 2million a week for upkeep I actually wished that the President and his NRM hangers-on cling in there till they are dramatically chased so that the injustice that is meted to likes of the women cleaners get avenged!

Stephen Twinoburyo: Maria, I’m glad you admit we have a snake in the house.

Surely Maria, one cannot manage a transition for 25 years. What he has not done in the past 25 years, he won’t do in the next 5. And like I mentioned earlier, it’s Museveni denying himself a good send off, not us. He has had many opportunities to have that send off. I doubt Museveni has confided in you that he intends to leave in 2016. If you read the post above, he in fact promised all Ugandans publicly that he would stay for only 5 years. Why should I now believe a word that has only come through you? Here is S Africa yesterday journalists asked him if he’s not worried of becoming a Ben Ali. He replied that he does not see the past 25 years as having been in power but rather being in the struggle. Following his answer, I later heard a radio host calling him one of those other African despots. I couldn’t agree more.

And Maria, all that narration you make about past leaders is true. That does not, however, exonerate him. He is increasingly dwarfing them in other ills that Ugandans will remember him for forever. This does not mean that he doesn’t have his positive qualities. Even Amin and Obote had but their ills washed away the positives. Museveni is increasingly getting in that boat.

The public health system in the country has completely collapsed such that Mulago hospital can no longer provide a panadol and patients carry their own needles for drip or injection, not to mention pregnant mothers that carry their own surgical gloves. Most of the public infrasructure and assets that Museveni found in place are gone. Public schools are a shadow of their former self and there is almost no institution except the army whose senior officers have in any case said they can only serve Museveni, leaving one wondering whether it’s even a national army. On the other hand corruption has had an unprecedented boom. In the face of biting poverty at the grassroots, the over-indulgence and appearance in all major deals of those connected to the president is phenomenal and an afront to the nation. Recently government showed its true priorities by importing 50 armoured riot vehicles and tracks of riot gear from China. This machinery was imported to terrorise Ugandans rather than serve them and also act as instruments of entrenchment. Had those tricks been carrying medicines, school books and agricultural products, Ugandans would have been cheering instead of the fear than now seems to be gripping them.

A few days after billions of Uganda shillings had been allocated to the president’s state house for “unplanned expenditure” as part of the Shillings 600 billion released by the ministry of finance as “emergency expenditure”, the government borrowed Shillings 800 billion from China for construction of 54 km of a multi-lane highway from Entebbe to Kampala. The original public money that has been channeled into campaigning for the president’s side could have done this job. But listen to such an obscure reason like “unplanned expenditure” – in hundreds of billions. Already, 6 months to the end of the financial year, all money allocated to government ministries has been used up and all projects and payments (except salaries) have been halted. According to the Monitor newspaper, the ministries have this financial year not been permitted to spend on their own and all expenditure was conducted through the president’s office, and went to the campaigns. The Uganda government will now either have to go into massive borrowing or heavy taxation or both. 

I’m really getting tired of that continuously repeated argument that Museveni is a good man that is only let down by his assistants – for 25 years. Are those assistants – his friends and family actually – appointing and maintaining themselves in their positions? Did you see the list David posted yesterday of Museveni’s billions of dollars in private wealth? Did he get that from his salary? What businesses did he have before becoming president? When we talk about corruption, we don’t exclude him Maria. I think you remember Museveni saying corruption can be developmental? Maria, blame number one is Museveni.

And nobody is yearning for instability. Instability can only be brought by Museveni himself.

David William Rukanshonga: Museveni’s failure is as a result of his incompetence. He has dismally failed us as a nation and we are tired of his excuses. You can’t tell me his ministers have let him down when he’s the same person who appointed them. I’ve said… it over and over again on this forum that he as president has the authority to hire and fire them at will and he doesn’t need approval from parliament or anybody else to do so.

He appoints them knowing they can deliver and if they fail or resort to corrupt tendencies, then he’s responsible. I take it that he’s happy with their performances if he let’s them stay or they share whatever has been stolen together

Honestly, if you were president and your ministers kept letting you down, would you let them stay and have your name tarnished? To me he doesn’t know what he’s doing or he appoints them coz they are his relatives, friends, comrades etc.

Earlier in this debate, I gave you an example of a CEO and his managers and I said share holders won’t blame managers when the company doesn’t make any profits but losses at the end of the year. They will instead blame the CEO for failing to come up with proper business plans and structures for the company to make profits.

His duties are to come up with profitable structures and plans which in turn, he passes on to them to implement and if they fail, he has to fire them and appoint competent ones.

I also gave you an example of a football team where by players are not blamed for poor performance but fans and supporters blame coaches instead.

A coach has to come up with a game plan which he will pass on to and instruct his players to do and when they loose, he will be blamed for coming up with a wrong game plan that didn’t work not the players who were told what to do and the plan failed.

The same principle applies to govt. M7 must devise plans to make the country grow, curb corruption and develop the nation with the resources the govt has. Not blame his ministers for not performing or letting him down. To me (as a share holder as in the example of a business) or a supporter ( as in the football example), I blame him for.

1) Selecting the wrong people (managers or players)

2) Not coming up with proper structures and or business plans.

He must also remember that people elected him and put their hopes and faith in him not his super ministers who do as they please coz they fought.

As for the insecurity, he was a major part of it. Again as earlier mentioned, if by any chance Kony overthrows the present govt, will he blame M7 alone for the insecurity as M7 does with Obote? No, they are both to blame and to me Kony will be the main culprit coz he waged the war against M7 and M7 had to counter attack and innocent civilians lost lives in the process.

M7 is not an angel but a thug to me.(excuse me for the harsh words). All he cares about is himself, his family and colleagues. Whoever falls out that group is a no body and is deemed useless according to him. No wonder in his campaigns he only talks about oil and how other candidates are after “his” oil.

 
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Posted by on January 23, 2011 in Stephen Twinoburyo's blogs

 

Uganda’s cultural leaders Bill 2010: What do you think?

The cultural leaders Bill 2010

THE Government recently tabled the Institution of Traditional or Cultural Leaders Bill, 2010 in Parliament. The Bill seeks to operationalise article 246 of the Constitution on the institution of traditional or cultural leaders.

PART I — PRELIMINARY
I. Commencement
This Act shall come into force on a date appointed by the minister by statutory instrument.

2. Interpretation
In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires —

“court” means the High Court of Uganda;

“Constitution’ means the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda;

“Constitutionalism” means adherence to constitutional principles;

“Corporation sole” means a continuous legal personality that is attributed to successive holders of certain monarchical positions such as kings;

“Currency point” has the value assigned to it in Schedule I;

“Institution of traditional or cultural leader’ means the throne, station, status or other position held by a traditional or cultural leader and “institution” shall be construed accordingly;

“Government” means the Government of Uganda;

“Minister” means the Minister responsible for culture;

“partisan politics” includes—

(a) promoting a political party or political organisation or any of its activities;

(b) rendering direct or indirect support to a political party or political organisation;

(c) recommending a particular person to the public with a view to promoting that person politically;

(d) promoting the manifesto, aspirations or views of a political party or political organisation;

(e) making statements against Government policies or programmes;

(f) making statements or comments on Bills or motions under consideration by Parliament with a view to influencing their outcome;

“Privilege” means a right, advantage or immunity, belonging to a traditional or cultural leader;

“traditional or cultural leader” means a king or similar traditional leader or cultural leader by whatever name called who derives allegiance from the fact of birth or descent in accordance with the customs, traditions, usage or consent of the people led by that traditional or cultural leader:

PART II
3. Institution of traditional or cultural leader

(1) Subject to the Constitution, the institution of traditional or cultural leader may exist in any area of Uganda in accordance with the culture, customs and traditions or wishes and aspirations of the people to whom it applies.

(2) Subject to subsection (1) a traditional or cultural institution may only be established by resolution of not less than two thirds of all members of the district local government councils and the sub-county local government councils respectively in the area.

(3) For the avoidance of doubt, the institution of traditional or cultural leader existing immediately before the coming into force of this Act shall be taken to exist in accordance with the Constitution and this Act.

4. Installation of traditional or cultural leader

(1) A person may be installed as a traditional or cultural leader in any area of Uganda if that person derives allegiance from¡X

(a) birth; or

(b) descent,

in accordance with the customs, traditions, usage or consent of the people where that person is recognised as a traditional or cultural leader.

(2) A person shall not be installed as a traditional or cultural leader unless the person derives allegiance from birth or descent in accordance with article 246(1) to (6) of the Constitution.

(3) A person shall not be compelled to pay allegiance to any person installed as a traditional or cultural leader.

(4) A person who compels another person to pay allegiance to a traditional or cultural leader commits an offence and is liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding 24 currency points or imprisonment not exceeding 12 months or both.

5. Recognition of traditional or cultural leader

(1) Notwithstanding anything in this Act, a person shall not be taken to be a traditional or cultural leader unless that person is recognised as such by the Government by a notice published in the Gazette.

(2) Government may recognise a traditional or cultural leader as such of any of the existing Uganda indigenous communities in accordance with article 10 and the Third Schedule of the Constitution.

(3) For the purposes of subsection (1) the traditional or cultural leaders listed in Schedule 2 are recognised as traditional or cultural leaders for the purposes of this Act.

6. Capacity of institution of traditional or cultural leader

(1) The institution of a traditional or cultural leader is a corporation sole with perpetual succession and with capacity to sue and be sued and to hold assets or properties in trust for itself and the people concerned.

(2) A traditional or cultural leader may hold any asset or property acquired in a personal capacity.

7. Withdrawal of recognition by Government

(1) The Government may in accordance with a court order withdraw its recognition of a traditional or cultural leader where the traditional or cultural leader¡X

(a) acts in contravention of the Constitution or this Act; or

(b) abdicates the institution of a traditional or cultural leader.

(2) Where the Government withdraws its recognition of a traditional or cultural leader the Government shall notify the traditional or cultural leader in writing and shall cause the notice of the withdrawal to be published in the Gazette.

8. Jurisdiction of traditional or cultural leaders

(1) The jurisdiction of a traditional or cultural leader is limited to the people within the community or area of Uganda who consent to pay allegiance to the traditional or cultural leader.

(2) For the avoidance of doubt, the traditional or cultural leader shall not limit the right of a person under article 37 of the Constitution to belong to, enjoy, practise, profess, maintain and promote any culture, cultural institution, language, tradition, creed or religion in the community with others.

PART 111¡XROLE OF TRADITIONAL AND CULTURAL LEADERS
9. Role of traditional or cultural leader in community

(1) Where a traditional or cultural leader exists in a region of Uganda where a regional government exists, the traditional or cultural leader shall be the titular head of that regional government,

(2) Where there is more than one traditional or cultural leader in the area of a regional government the position of the titular head of the regional government shall be held by each of the traditional or cultural leaders within the area of the regional government in rotation for one year at a time.

PART TV¡XPRIVILEGES AND BENEFITS
10. Privileges and benefits of a traditional or cultural leader

(1) A recognised traditional or cultural leader shall enjoy the privileges and benefits specified in Schedule 3.

(2) A local government may by resolution provide privileges and benefits to a traditional or cultural leader as the local government thinks necessary.

(3) Where regional government is established in any area, then the privileges and benefits of the traditional or cultural leader may be determined by the regional government as a block.

(4) Where a traditional or cultural leader is recognised in more than one regional government, the benefits shall be paid by the regional governments in equal proportions.

(5) Without prejudice to this section, a traditional or cultural leader shall enjoy the privileges and benefits that the traditional or cultural leader is entitled to under culture, custom or tradition which are not inconsistent with the Constitution or this Act or any other law.

(6) The benefits payable under this section shall be free from income tax.

(7) The duties and responsibilities of the traditional or cultural leader may be financed through central government from the Consolidated Fund as a grant.

11. Responsibility of the community where a traditional or cultural leader exists

(I) The community where a traditional or cultural leader is installed shall have the primary responsibility of maintaining the traditional or cultural leader.

(2) Notwithstanding subsection (I), a person shall not be compelled to contribute to the cost of maintaining a traditional or cultural leader or any institution of the traditional or cultural leader

PART V¡XRESTRICTIONS ON A TRADITIONAL OR CULTURAL LEADER
12. Exercise of administrative, legislative or executive powers

A traditional or cultural leader shall not have or exercise any administrative, legislative or executive powers of Government or a local government.

13. Traditional or cultural leaders not to join or participate in partisan politics

(1) A person shall not, while remaining a traditional or cultural leader, join or participate in partisan politics.

(2) A traditional or cultural leader wishing to take part and seeking elective office shall abdicate his position in the institution not less than 90 days before nomination day in respect of that election.

(3) For the purposes of this section a person joins or participates in partisan politics when that person¡X

(a) becomes a registered member or card bearing member of the political party or political organisation;

(b) Provides a platform where the members of a political party or political organisation articulate the views, aspirations and interests of that political party or political organisation;

(c) attends a rally or debate where the views, aspirations or interests of a political party or political organisation are articulated;

(d) allows the facilities of a traditional or cultural institution to be used in the promotion of partisan politics;

(e) allows a person in the employment of the traditional or cultural institution of which the person is a leader to engage in any of the activities referred to in paragraphs (a) to (d).

(4) The withdrawal of recognition shall be by notice published in the Gazette.

14. Prohibited customs or traditions
A traditional or cultural leader or institution shall not practise any custom, culture, usage or tradition that detracts from the rights of any person as guaranteed under the Constitution or contravenes the Constitution or any other law.

15. Relationship with foreign governments
(1) A traditional or cultural leader shall not deal with foreign governments except with the approval of the minister responsible for foreign affairs.

(2) The minister responsible for foreign affairs shall develop guidelines for approval to be granted under subsection (1).

PART VI¡XRESOLUTI0N OF DISPUTES
16. Resolution of disputes

(1) Any conflict or dispute within the traditional or cultural institution or within the community shall be handled by a council of elders or clan leaders or a representative body chosen and approved by the community, in accordance with the traditions, customs and norms of dispute or conflict resolution pertaining to that community.

(2) Where the community fails to resolve the conflict or dispute in accordance with subsection (1), the matter shall be referred to the court.

(3) For the avoidance of doubt, the conflict or dispute referred to in sub-section (1) is a conflict or dispute relating to¡X

(a) Whether or not a community should have a traditional or cultural leader: or

(b) Who should be the traditional or cultural leader of the community or area of Uganda.

PART VI¡XMISCELLANEOUS
17. Publication of list of traditional or cultural leaders.
The ministry responsible for culture shall once in every calendar year cause to be published in the Gazette a List of all traditional or cultural leaders in Uganda whom Government facilitates.

18. Liability of traditional or cultural leaders

(1) A traditional or cultural leader is personally liable for any civil wrongs or criminal offences committed by the traditional or cultural leader or the agents or persons in the employment or acting under the authority of the traditional or cultural leader

(2) A person who purports to act on behalf of the traditional and cultural leader without authority or knowledge of the traditional and cultural leader is liable for any civil or criminal acts committed by him or her.

19. Symbols and seals of institution of traditional or cultural leaden

(1) Institutions of traditional or cultural leaders may have flags, anthems, seals and logos.

(2) Flags, anthems, seals and logos of traditional or cultural leaders existing before the coming into force of this Act shall continue to be in use.

20. Power of Minister to amend Schedules

The minister may, by statutory instrument, with the approval of Cabinet amend any Schedule to this Act.

21. Regulations
(1) The Minister may, with the approval of Parliament, by statutory instrument, make regulations for the better carrying into effect of the provisions of this Act.

(2) Regulations made under this section may prescribe in respect of contravention of the regulations, penalties not exceeding a fine of forty eight currency points or imprisonment not exceeding two years or both.

 
8 Comments

Posted by on January 4, 2011 in Stephen Twinoburyo's blogs